Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies


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Chopin was an ideal to Liszt though he has not left us a record of his defects. The Pole was ombrageux and easily offended; he disliked democracies, in fact mankind in the bulk stunned him. This is one reason, combined with a frail physique, of his inability to conquer the larger public. Thalberg could do it; his aristocratic tournure, imperturbability, beautiful touch and polished mechanism won the suffrage of his audiences.

Liszt never stooped to cajole. He came, he played, he overwhelmed. Chopin knew all this, knew his weaknesses, and fought to overcome them but failed.

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Another crumpled roseleaf for this man of excessive sensibility. Since told of Liszt and first related by him, is the anecdote of Chopin refusing to play, on being incautiously pressed, after dinner, giving as a reason "Ah, sir, I have eaten so little! Chopin met Osborne, Mendelssohn—who rather patronized him with his "Chopinetto,"—Baillot the violinist and Franchomme the 'cellist. With the latter he contracted a lasting friendship, often playing duos with him and dedicating to him his G minor 'cello Sonata.


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He called on Kalkbrenner, then the first pianist of his day, who was puzzled by the prodigious novelty of the young Pole's playing. Having heard Herz and Hiller, Chopin did not fear to perform his E minor concerto for him. He tells all about the interview in a letter to Titus: "Are you a pupil of Field's? Not having a standard by which to gauge the new phenomenon, Kalkbrenner was forced to fall back on the playing of men he knew. He then begged Chopin to study three years with him—only three!

Chopin actually attended the class of Kalkbrenner but soon quit, for he had nothing to learn of the pompous, penurious pianist. The Hiller story of how Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt and Heller teased this grouty old gentleman on the Boulevard des Italiens is capital reading, if not absolutely true. Yet Chopin admired Kalkbrenner's finished technique despite his platitudinous manner. Heine said—or rather quoted Koreff—that Kalkbrenner looked like a bonbon that had been in the mud.

Niecks thinks Chopin might have learned of Kalkbrenner on the mechanical side. Chopin, in public, was modest about his attainments, looking upon himself as self-taught. It is this very absence of scholasticism that is both the power and weakness of his music. In reality his true technical ancestor was Hummel.

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He played the E minor concerto first in Paris, February 26, , and some smaller pieces. Although Kalkbrenner, Baillot and others participated, Chopin was the hero of the evening. The affair was a financial failure, the audience consisting mostly of distinguished and aristocratic Poles. Mendelssohn, who disliked Kalkbrenner and was angered at his arrogance in asking Chopin to study with him, "applauded furiously. On May 20, , Chopin appeared at a charity concert organized by Prince de la Moskowa. He was lionized in society and he wrote to Titus that his heart beat in syncopation, so exciting was all this adulation, social excitement and rapid gait of living.

But he still sentimentalizes to Titus and wishes him in Paris. A flirtation of no moment, with Francilla Pixis, the adopted daughter of Pixis the hunchback pianist—cruelly mimicked by Chopin—aroused the jealousy of the elder artist.

Chopin was delighted, for he was malicious in a dainty way. The loss of the letters is irremediable.


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  6. Karasowski who saw some of them says they were tinged with melancholy. Despite his artistic success Chopin needed money and began to consider again his projected trip to America. Luckily he met Prince Valentine Radziwill on the street, so it is said, and was persuaded to play at a Rothschild soiree. From that moment his prospects brightened, for he secured paying pupils. Niecks, the iconoclast, has run this story to earth and finds it built on airy, romantic foundations.

    Liszt, Hiller, Franchomme and Sowinski never heard of it although it was a stock anecdote of Chopin. Chopin must have broadened mentally as well as musically in this congenial, artistic environment. He went about, hobnobbed with princesses, and of the effect of this upon his compositions there can be no doubt. If he became more cosmopolitan he also became more artificial and for a time the salon with its perfumed, elegant atmosphere threatened to drug his talent into forgetfulness of loftier aims. Luckily the master-sculptor Life intervened and real troubles chiselled his character on tragic, broader and more passionate lines.


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    7. He played frequently in public during with Hiller, Liszt, Herz and Osborne, and much in private. There was some rivalry in this parterre of pianists. Liszt, Chopin and Hiller indulged in friendly contests and Chopin always came off winner when Polish music was essayed. He delighted in imitating his colleagues, Thalberg especially. Adolphe Brisson tells of a meeting of Sand, Chopin and Thalberg, where, as Mathias says, the lady "chattered like a magpie" and Thalberg, after being congratulated by Chopin on his magnificent virtuosity, reeled off polite phrases in return; doubtless he valued the Pole's compliments for what they were worth.

      The moment his back was presented, Chopin at the keyboard was mocking him. It was then Chopin told Sand of his pupil, Georges Mathias, "c'est une bonne caboche.

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      After a concert by Chopin he astonished Hiller by shouting on the way home. In reply to questions he slily answered that he needed a forte as he had heard nothing but pianissimo the entire evening! Chopin was never a hearty partisan of the Romantic movement. Its extravagance, misplaced enthusiasm, turbulence, attacks on church, state and tradition disturbed the finical Pole while noise, reclame and boisterousness chilled and repulsed him. He wished to be the Uhland of Poland, but he objected to smashing idols and refused to wade in gutters to reach his ideal.

      He was not a fighter, yet as one reviews the past half century it is his still small voice that has emerged from the din, the golden voice of a poet and not the roar of the artistic demagogues of his day. Liszt's influence was stimulating, but what did not Chopin do for Liszt? Read Schumann.

      There he met Hiller and Mendelssohn at the painter Schadow's and improvised marvellously, so Hiller writes. He visited Coblenz with Hiller before returning home. Professor Niecks has a deep spring of personal humor which he taps at rare intervals. He remarks that "the coming to Paris and settlement there of his friend Matuszynski must have been very gratifying to Chopin, who felt so much the want of one with whom to sigh. After literally ratting her in a separate chapter, he winds up his work with the solemn assurance that he abstains "from pronouncing judgment because the complete evidence did not seem to me to warrant my doing so.

      When I met this biographer at Bayreuth in , I told him how much I had enjoyed his work, adding that I found it indispensable in the re-construction of Chopin. Professor Niecks gazed at me blandly—he is most amiable and scholarly-looking—and remarked, "You are not the only one.

      But Niecks, in , built on Karasowski, Liszt, Schumann, Sand and others, so the process is bound to continue. Since much has been written of Chopin, much surmised. With Matuszysnki the composer was happier. He devoutly loved his country and despite his sarcasm was fond of his countrymen. Never an extravagant man, he invariably assisted the Poles. After , Chopin's activity as a public pianist began to wane. He was not always understood and was not so warmly welcomed as he deserved to be; on one occasion when he played the Larghetto of his F minor concerto in a Conservatoire concert, its frigid reception annoyed him very much.

      Nevertheless he appeared at a benefit concert at Habeneck's, April 26, The papers praised, but his irritability increased with every public performance. About this time he became acquainted with Bellini, for whose sensuous melodies he had a peculiar predilection. In July, , Chopin met his father at Carlsbad. Schumann gushes over Chopin, but this friendliness was never reciprocated. On his return to Paris Chopin visited Heidelberg, where he saw the father of his pupil, Adolphe Gutmann, and reached the capital of the civilized world the middle of October.

      Meanwhile a love affair had occupied his attention in Dresden. In September, , Chopin met his old school friends, the Wodzinskis, former pupils at his father's school. He fell in love with their sister Marie and they became engaged.

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      He spoke to his father about the matter, and for the time Paris and his ambitions were forgotten. He enjoyed a brief dream of marrying and of settling near Warsaw, teaching and composing—the occasional dream that tempts most active artists, soothing them with the notion that there is really a haven of rest from the world's buffets. Again the gods intervened in the interest of music. The father of the girl objected on the score of Chopin's means and his social position—artists were not Paderewskis in those days—although the mother favored the romance. The Wodzinskis were noble and wealthy.

      In the summer of , at Marienbad, Chopin met Marie again. In , the engagement was broken and the following year the inconstant beauty married the son of Chopin's godfather, Count Frederic Skarbek. As the marriage did not prove a success—perhaps the lady played too much Chopin—a divorce ensued and later she married a gentleman by the name of Orpiszewski.

      CHOPIN: THE MAN AND HIS MUSIC

      But Chopin survived the shock. His stay was short, only eleven days, and his chest trouble dates from this time. He played at the house of James Broadwood, the piano manufacturer, being introduced by Pleyel as M. Fritz; but his performance betrayed his identity.

      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies
      Chasing Butterflies, Op. 63, No. 11, from Twelve Very Easy and Melodious Studies

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